Slim-Line Double Glazed

Slim Double Glazing

Period timber windows are normally unable to accommodate double glazed units, and many planning authorities object to double glazing being installed in listed buildings and sensitive conservation areas.

Slimline double glazing is a viable alternative that is accepted by conservation officers in many cases. Wessex Restoration supplies and installs Slimlite double glazed units, designed to fit existing sash windows.

By using a smaller, gas-filled gap between the glass panes, slim double glazed units can achieve an energy rating on par with standard double glazing. This makes them perfect for heritage buildings and period homes which need both the thermal benefits of energy efficiency and an authentic period appearance.

Slimlite glazing features

  • Designed to replace single glazing in traditional sash windows
  • Similar low U values to double glazing
  • In-keeping with traditional aesthetics
  • Ideal for listed buildings and conservation areas

We work closely with local authorities and conservation officers to find the best solution for every property. If slim double glazing is not approved, we can offer single glazing, secondary glazing and shutters.

Double glazed shutters

We can also manufacture and install ultra slim line double glazed shutters that provide high levels of insulation, whilst remaining sympathetic to the building’s original design. Our glazed shutters do not interfere with the normal sashes during winter and can fold away discreetly in the summer for a practical alternative to slim double glazing.

Our Restoration Projects

We have carried out renovation projects on numerous properties in conservation areas and listed buildings. Read about some of our heritage restoration projects, including bespoke designs and replica period features!

timber sash window renovation
Case study: Timber sash window renovation and repair
Tyndalls Park Road
Refurbishing Grade II listed building at the University of Bristol
Soldiers of Gloucester Museum
Georgian timber windows for a Gloucestershire museum